Takeaways

  • You can receive unemployment benefits while receiving Social Security disability benefits.
  • You can receive Social Security disability benefits and military retirement benefits at the same time although there is a maximum benefit amount that the Social Security Administration will decide upon.
  • Returning to work after a period of disability depends on a number of factors, including how much you will earn and the type of work you will be doing.

You can receive unemployment benefits while receiving Social Security disability benefits. However, it can affect a Social Security disability claim.

There are a lot of cases where a person is filing for unemployment benefits because of a termination or because of health problems. However, for unemployment benefits, you have to attest that you are ready, willing, and ready, willing and able to work. For Social Security disability benefits, you’re saying that you cannot work. Thus, there can be a conflict.

For the best advice while pursuing a disability claim, it’s important to let your Social Security disability attorney know if you are receiving unemployment benefits, when they started, when they will stop, and how much you are receiving.

Can I Receive VA Benefits While Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits?

You can receive retirement benefits based on your military service as well as Social Security disability benefits, or Social Security retirement benefits if you paid in or if you’re eligible for them. There is a maximum benefit amount, and the Social Security Administration will determine the offset.

A lot of people think that VA’s disability determination shares the same basis as Social Security disability benefits, but that is not true. The military and Social Security use two different sets of rules when determining disability. If the VA has said you’re disabled, Social Security can find you not disabled. However, if you are found eligible for both types of disability, you can receive both military and Social Security benefits.

Can I Or Should I Return To Work While Getting Social Security Disability Benefits If I’m Able To Do Some Light Work?

If you have a health problem that affects you and cannot work for some time, you can file for Social Security disability. The Social Security Administration requires you to be disabled for 12 full months before applying for disability benefits. If you can only work for eleven months or less, you’re not going to be eligible for Social Security disability.

If you’ve been disabled or cannot work for 18 months, and you return to light work on a full-time basis after that, we can still pursue that claim for those 18 months. It depends on each person’s situation, and what they can do work-wise. If you feel you are able to return to work, it is important to discuss that plan with your treating medical providers.

However, if you cannot return to light work on a full-time basis, then you should not take the chance to hurt yourself or others by being unable to perform the job.

Again, to provide you with the best advice, Social Security disability attorneys need to know when you can start, how many hours you plan to work, and how much you will be paid.

If I Get Social Security Disability Benefits And Reach Retirement Age Will I Then Receive Retirement Benefits Instead?

Social Security will evaluate which amount is higher, your disability payment, and your retirement payment, which varies person-to-person. For some people, a disability benefit is higher than an early retirement benefit. For some people at full retirement age, it’s higher than the disability benefit. The full retirement age benefit is often higher, but it can vary. Social Security will analyze which benefit amount you will receive and pay you whichever amount is higher. You will not receive two separate checks though.

For more information on Receiving Unemployment And Social Security Benefits, an initial consultation is your next best step. Get the information and legal answers you are seeking by calling (859) 681-9111 today.

Stacey Hardin Hibbard PLLC

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(859) 681-9111

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